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Parlays

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Parlays (US Sports)


A parlay is a single bet that links together anywhere from 2 to 10 individual plays. The parlay can be comprised of a series of bets on a team, over/under bets, or any mixture of the two. For the parlay to be a winning wager, every one of its individual plays must win. If any of the individual plays is not a winner, then the entire parlay wager loses.

 

If, however, one of the individual plays is a "push," then the parlay is still on for the remaining plays. A three play parlay would become a two play parlay; a two play parlay would become a straight bet, with corresponding reductions of the payoff.

 

Why wager on a parlay and not make several individual bets? The payouts for parlays are significantly higher than for individual bets. But remember, since every one of the individual plays must win, it's an all-or-nothing bet. If you win two out of three plays, the parlay still loses, whereas you would have won those two plays as individual straight bets. You are given better odds because predicting the outcomes of several plays together is significantly more difficult than predicting any individual play.

You cannot parlay circled games.

 

These are the risk/win odds for parlay (Football & Basketball) bets:

 

  All Winners All Losers
2 team 13/5 --
3 team 6/1 --
4 team: 10/1 --
5 team 20/1 --
6 team 40/1 Even
7 team 75/1 2/1
8 team 150/1 5/1
9 team 250/1 10/1
10 team 400/1 15/1

 

Even Losers are Winners!


Parlays are a great way to bet and now Sportbet.com has made it even more interesting! Bet a 6-team parlay or more and if every one of your picks loses - YOU WIN!!!

Let's put the theory into action:

 

Example:
Dave has $250 available in his account and would like to make a three play parlay.
On the Betting Lines page, he would select "parlay," enter the amount he would like to wager, $50 in this instance,
then select the individual plays that will make up his parlay.
$50 is deducted from his account. His balance now reads $200 available, $50 at risk.

When he's done making his selections, the page might look like this:


Amount of wager $50


  Match Side Total
4/19/99 7:35:00 PM
   
101 miami dolphins (7.0)-110 Over 34(-110)
224 ATLANTA FALCONS (-7.0)-110 Under 34(-110)
4/19/99 7:35:00 PM    
215 baltimore ravens (-3.5)-110 Over 32.5(-110)
641 NEW ORLEANS SAINTS (3.5)-110 Under 32.5(-110)

OUTCOME I

Say the results of the two games were the following:

Miami 27
Atlanta 10
Baltimore 25
New Orleans 20


The first play wins: Miami, the underdog, won the game. They either had to win the game outright or lose by less than 7 for this play to be a winner.

The second play wins: the sum of the Miami and Atlanta's final scores was 37. Any total of 35 or higher would have made this play a winner.

 

The third play wins: Baltimore beat New Orleans by 5 points, thus covering the point spread of 3.5. Baltimore had to win the game by 4 points or more for this play to be a winner.

 

Since all three of the plays were winners, the parlay wager wins. The payoff odds for a three play parlay are 1/6. Thus Dave's $50 bet returns $300. Unlike straight bets, in which the original bet is returned to the bettor if he or she wins, parlay payouts include the original wager. $300 is deposited to Dave's account. His balance now reads $500 available, $0 at risk.

 

OUTCOME II

Say the results of the same two games were instead:

Miami 17
Atlanta 10
Baltimore 24
New Orleans 20

 

Dave's first play wins: Miami, the underdog, won the game. They either had to win the game outright or lose by less that 7 for this play to be a winner.

The second play loses: the sum of Miami and Atlanta's final scores was 27. Any total of 33 or below loses.

The third play wins: Baltimore won by 4 points, thus covering the point spread of 3.5. Baltimore had to win by 4 points or more for this play to be a winner.

 

Since the second play was not a winner, the parlay bet loses. No money is returned. His balance now reads: $200 available, $0 at risk.